We love it when food and fashion mix—which seems to happen more and more often these days. It’s thanks in part to people like Kerry Diamond, who have blazed a stylish trail forward. The former beauty editor and public relations executive made a new career for herself as a restaurant owner, magazine co-founder (she and Claudia Wu are the brains behind the popular bi-annual Cherry Bombe), and now editor-in-chief of Yahoo Food.

She manages to juggle her responsibilities on Smith Street in Brooklyn (that’s where her, count ‘em, three eateries are) with her editorial duties all the while dressing in the most unimpeachably cool of ways. Read on for our interview with Kerry—including a Thanksgiving-worthy recipe for orange cranberry sauce—as well as her stylish selections from Barneys New York.

The Window: Restaurateur, magazine co-founder, and now digital EIC at Yahoo Food—what do you love about each role, and do you take naps?
Kerry Diamond: I come from a long line of nap enthusiasts, but I don’t nap. I do need a full night’s sleep, however. Who are these magical people who get by on five hours? Anyways, what I love about each is actually the same thing. It’s about getting the mix right: the right mix of people, ideas, and content. It’s trusting in your ideas and finding the right partners to execute everything—much harder than it sounds, but it’s really magical when it all comes together.

You have been exceptionally busy in a most diverse way the past few years. Any tips to keep it all together?
You really have to be ruthlessly organized, and it’s not always easy, especially if that doesn’t come naturally to you. I like to eat healthy, and I often bring my lunch and snacks to work. That means hitting the farmers market on Sundays and prepping everything for the week ahead. I’ve also pared down my wardrobe. If it’s not blue, black, or grey (or animal print!), I try not to buy it. Same with my beauty routine. Simplify, simplify, simplify. The most important thing is not to beat yourself up. No one can do it all. If you don’t get to something, you don’t get to it.

How would you describe the editorial vision for Yahoo Food? 
I love the digital food space. I think there are so many bloggers, Instagrammers, Pinners, and others doing fascinating things and so many of them deserve a bigger audience. To me, these people should be the new celebrity chefs. They have devoted fan bases, they make wonderful food that isn’t overly complicated, and they often photograph and style their dishes beautifully. They make people want to cook again, and that’s so important. So, celebrating these digital influencers and encouraging home cooks—that will be a big part of the recipe for Yahoo Food moving forward.

What is your perfect Sunday night at-home meal?
Sunday nights are special because my boyfriend Rob has the night off. Amazingly, he still loves to cook on Sunday nights for us even though he cooks all week at work at our restaurants. I’m biased, obviously, but I think he’s the best chef around, so I love everything he makes. Often, it’s something deceptively simple but deeply delicious. A roast chicken, roast vegetables, a green salad, some form of potatoes, and a beautiful bottle of red wine.

What are your Thanksgiving plans this year?
For the past several years, my boyfriend and I have celebrated Thanksgiving at his mother’s house in Arkansas. Rob always deep-fries a turkey…it’s the best turkey you’ve ever had, and you wouldn’t believe how fast it cooks. This year, we’re ordering a heritage breed turkey from Heritage Foods USA, which started out as part of the Slow Food organization. Rob’s mom loves to cook, too, so I don’t wind up doing too much. I get to kick back a little.

What’s on your ideal holiday menu?
I went through a period where I was a stressed-out hostess because I was always trying to do too much. I’ve learned over the years to keep it simple. It’s easy in New York because there are so many great prepared food places. I love hors d’oeuvres, so a fun spread of hors d’oeuvres would be a blast. Say pigs in blankets, homemade potato chips with homemade onion dip, and domestic caviar. And of course some great Champagne or local sparkling wine.

How would you describe your personal style?
Ever evolving! My wardrobe usually changes based on my job. At the restaurant on the weekends, it’s more about being practical: jeans, sneakers, and a striped shirt. I do love classics.

Can you recall an important outfit you wore in your life? 
I still remember what I wore on my first date with my boyfriend. We had met online, so technically it was a blind date. I wore a navy blue Thakoon dress, a chunky Marni necklace, and black boots. I still have the dress and wear it from time to time. I’ll never get rid of it. That night changed my life!

KERRY’S PICKS FROM BARNEYS NeW YORK

kerry is kewl

HOW TO BE PARISIAN WHEREVER YOU ARE
“A book for all the girls who secretly want to be Parisiennes.”

THAKOON DOWNING CLASSIC ZIP CLUTCH
“I love a clutch and I love Thakoon, so voila!”

PLAY BY COMME DES GARÇONS CHUCK TAYLOR LOW-TOP
Sneakers that make you (and me) smile, and they’re Converse to boot.”

DRIES VAN NOTEN HAND-SEQUINED TOP
“This top is festive without trying too hard. Always key.”

ANN DEXTER-JONES ID BRACELET
Chunky bracelets rule, and Ann’s are really chic.”

RAY-BAN WAYFARER
Classic for a reason.”

R13 SHREDDED PULLOVER SWEATER
“A fun, punky approach to sweater weather.”

kerry 2

CONNOR MONOGRAM STATIONARY SET
“What’s nicer than a handwritten note?”

1882 LTD. FRAGILE HEARTS MUG
“No one at work will mistake this mug for his or her own.”

DIPTYQUE FEU DE BOIS CANDLE
“The best cold-weather candle. Instant fireplace.”

kerry 3

FREDS AT BARNEYS NEW YORK PARIS TEA
“A cup of tea is so civilized!”

BARNEYS NEW YORK LEATHER-HANDLE ICE SCOOP
“A Barneys ice scoop? Everyone needs one!”

TINA FREY DESIGNS CHAMPAGNE BUCKET
“Champagne makes everything festive, especially when served in a Tina Frey bucket.”

FREDS AT BARNEYS NEW YORK OREGON STRAWBERRY PRESERVES
“A little taste of summer all winter long.”

VOSGES HAUT-CHOCOLAT MINI EXOTIC CHOCOLATE BAR LIBRARY
“Anything Vosges is my weakness. I have a wicked sweet tooth.”

SHOP ALL KERRY DIAMOND’S PICKSSHOP ALL WOMEN’S

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Kerry’s Easy Orange Cranberry SAUCE

Growing up, during the holidays when there would be a turkey or a ham on the table, my family always had cranberry sauce. From a can. One day, many years ago, I saw a bag of Ocean Spray cranberries in the supermarket, picked it up, and noticed a recipe on the back for a simple three-ingredient cranberry sauce. I made the recipe for Thanksgiving and proudly put the dish on the table. No one touched it. Stubborn me probably ate the whole bowl in protest.

My family, I’m happy to report, has since come around. And to this day, I still don’t understand why anyone would serve cranberry sauce in a can. I’ve tweaked the recipe over the years—as much as you can tweak something that only has three ingredients—by decreasing the sugar and adding some fresh squeezed orange juice and orange zest. Citrus season coincides with the holidays, so it’s a nice use of seasonal produce.

This cranberry sauce goes beautifully with turkey or ham and all the trimmings. It’s also excellent on a leftover turkey sandwich. Get a Martin’s potato roll, smear one side with Hellmann’s mayonnaise, and smear the other side with the cranberry sauce. Layer on some dark- and white-meat turkey, stuffing (or dressing if you call it that), and some iceberg lettuce and enjoy the best sandwich of your life.

Ingredients
2/3 cup sugar
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup fresh squeezed orange juice
1-2 tsp. orange zest
1 12-ounce package of fresh cranberries, picked over

Directions
1. Bring the sugar, water, and orange juice to a boil.
2. Add the cranberries and return to a boil. Reduce the heat and let bubble gently for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat.
3. Stir in the zest, let cool, and serve.
This refrigerates well for several days. If you like your cranberries less tart, you can increase the sugar slightly, but don’t add more than one cup total.

SHOP ALL KERRY DIAMOND’S PICKSSHOP ALL WOMEN’S

Photographed by Erik Garcia.
Styled by Amalia Ehrmann and Molly O’Donnell.