Pamela Love’s Brooklyn apartment is kind of like her namesake line: rustic yet polished, imaginative, and just plain cool. She’s invited us over for coffee to showcase her latest collection of sculptural pieces, which features stones in rich shades of green, blue, and amber that pop against their polished sterling silver settings. Apologizing for “the mess” that we hadn’t even noticed, she explains she’s been redoing her apartment. “It’s hard to ignore how much this collection corresponds to me renovating my house,” she admits. “I’ve been so focused on home décor that I became obsessed, and it trickled into my design process.”

With our coffee still piping hot, we had plenty of time to pick Love’s creative brain about how such inspirations came together.

Pamela Love
Pamela Love photographed at home for theprojectforwomen.com

The Window: Tell us about the resort collection. What were the inspirations? Are there any new themes or shapes?
Pamela Love:
This collection in particular is extremely sculptural. I’ve been really obsessing over interiors lately and looking at a lot of Danish modern interiors and pottery from the ‘50s -‘70s. Matt [Pam’s husband] and I went to Copenhagen recently, which was a huge inspiration. I’m basically just constantly researching, too. I’m very obsessed with this Mexican architect Javier Senosiain and have been looking at a lot of his work, as well as Kendrick Kellogg. I’m drawn to these sculptural shapes from architecture and homewares, like Dansk bowls and wooden objects.

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PAMELA LOVE Large Stratum Pendant Necklace

The stones and colors in this collection are striking.
There are some unusual stone choices for sure. I worked with a stone called royal savannah jasper, which is a type of polychrome jasper that has a lot of different pinks, reds, and purples. It can go from looking one way to another, and it’s very whimsical and one-of-a-kind. We also used malachite, which I’m obsessed with, and lapis—a forever favorite. This collection has a lot of play with stones and color, which is always what we’re known for, as well as inlay work.

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PAMELA LOVE Inlay Cocktail Ring / PAMELA LOVE Inlay Cocktail Ring

It’s been 10 years since you started the line in your apartment. How have you evolved over the years?
I’ve grown up. I started this business as a single girl living in Williamsburg in my twenties. I had a very different aesthetic and lifestyle. Over the years, you grow up and develop your tastes, and in some cases maybe it gets a bit more sophisticated. I think that the evolution in the jewelry does reflect some of my own, but the DNA is very much the same throughout. The things that I’m most concerned with are the craft and unusual techniques, the obsession with stones, and storytelling. I think that every season is different while always feeling very me. Every season it’s the same girl, but she’s going on a different journey, whether she’s in a different time in history or going to a different part of the world. This season she’s probably decorating her house!

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PAMELA LOVE Large Stratum Pendant Necklace / PAMELA LOVE Pendulum Ear Jackets

How does New York City continue to inspire you and your designs?
I think Brooklyn is endlessly inspiring. It’s always changing—just like a collection—but it’s always still Brooklyn. It’s interesting to see the evolution of the neighborhoods. Watching Williamsburg change from this artist enclave to the new Soho has been fascinating. I’ve been in Greenpoint the last 10 years and have seen a lot of changes here too. I love seeing how the original culture of the neighborhood always manages to survive and integrate into what’s new.

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PAMELA LOVE Large Stratum Pendant Necklace / PAMELA LOVE Pendulum Ear Jackets

What about your Floridian roots—how did growing up there influence you?
There’re parts of Florida that are super glamorous and exciting … and I didn’t grow up in those parts. I grew up in a sleepy suburb, and the thing that it gave me was that it forced me to develop an imagination. There wasn’t a ton of stuff going on, so I became very focused on making jewelry from a young age. I’d be locked in my room coming up with various projects—collages, paintings, and jewelry. Making things was my outlet for there not being a ton of things going on around me.

You have an amazing ability to tap into different cultures.
I’ve always been fascinated by places with a real mash up of cultures. That’s one of the reasons I love the Southwest—that mixture of Native American culture with cowboy culture and Mexican culture. Miami definitely has an element of that, as does Brooklyn. I like exploring how different images and iconography repeat themselves in different cultures. It reminds me that we are all human and we all search for meaning.

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PAMELA LOVE Inlay Cross Cuff / PAMELA LOVE Inlay Cocktail Ring

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What else is currently inspiring you that we might see pop up in future collections?
As I mentioned, I’ve been increasingly interested in the work of Javiar Senosiain. We are going to Mexico City at the end of December, and I’m trying to figure out how to meet him! The new collection I’m working on takes inspiration from him, but then also from Ancient Roman and Greek artifacts. My inspirations are fluid, and they mix together in really interesting ways. One theme might stay for a while and mix with a new one in an interesting way. Then, one will exit out and another will come in. The transitions are interesting and make the collections work back well together.

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